STILL WISH YOU WERE HERE


The Vintage Voyeur are great friends of ours through years of travelling to the wonderful landscapes of Yorkshire and Leeds.


Hoarders, Johnny come latelies and Trimm Dich figures, despite the tounge in cheek humour, sarcasm and “80s fun” that has become significant for this creative force, there are also some real lifestories that has shaped what The Vintage Voyeur is.

One of those life stories being the one of Johnny Ruttledge ­ Leeds VYT, who passed away in 2012. This new design displaying the VYT business card and the classic Smiths quote ”There is a light that never goes out” is a good example of that. That real life is filled with both laughter and tears. This new design is also a must have.

Blessed with a first dib, we’ve been asked out and about: “where you got that tee mate” ,at the pub or at the game. Well we got the t-shirt from our friends at The Vintage Voyeur and this is our shout out to you. Get this new design you too ­ i can promise that they will go fast.

This little entry is also first and foremost another shout out to Johnny, Rest in peace our friend. Today, the 3rd of august was your birthday.


Watch these two sites for updates on this must have, dedicated in Johnnys memory (03.08.1971-22.05.2012)

thevintagevoyeur.bigcartel.com/


Take me out tonight
Where there’s music and there’s people
And they’re young and alive
Driving in your car
I never never want to go home
Because I haven’t got one
Anymore

Take me out tonight
Because I want to see people and I
Want to see life
Driving in your car
Oh, please don’t drop me home
Because it’s not my home, it’s their
Home, and I’m welcome no more

And if a double-decker bus
Crashes into us
To die by your side
Is such a heavenly way to die
And if a ten-ton truck
Kills the both of us
To die by your side
Well, the pleasure - the privilege is mine

Take me out tonight
Take me anywhere, I don’t care
I don’t care, I don’t care
And in the darkened underpass
I thought oh God, my chance has come at last
(But then a strange fear gripped me and I
Just couldn’t ask)

Take me out tonight
Oh, take me anywhere, I don’t care
I don’t care, I don’t care
Driving in your car
I never never want to go home
Because I haven’t got one, da
Oh, I haven’t got one

And if a double-decker bus
Crashes into us
To die by your side
Is such a heavenly way to die
And if a ten-ton truck
Kills the both of us
To die by your side
Well, the pleasure - the privilege is mine

OUR CULTURE - EBBETS FIELD


We are really proud to introduce to you, the Our Culture and Ebbets Field hat. The hat is a standard 6 panel, made of black wool with the Our Culture letters OC in white wool to show which team you support. 

Ebbets Field is a great company providing the world high quality, American sportswear with a vintage touch since 1988 and is a company we always have had the deepest respect for as their quality standards is something you dont often see these days.

That said, we really love this hat and its something we always wanted to do. Its heavy, its wool, its black, its OC. Hope you like it. 

Released 2014-06-09 17.00 (Swedish time) over atstore.thisisourculture.com

THE BLACK PROJECT


image

”So it became 68 = Paris, situationist, Weathermen etc. and 76 = Punk rock/Soweto riots etc.”


- Kenneth McKenzie

Since one of the cornerstones of the Black Project is to not promote or market it… we wont do that. We (Our Culture) are together with our friends at CasualCo very proud of our small contribution to this unique black beauty. The black Capandula is just everything you would think it is very in guernica de la notte-ish…rough, black and clean. 

This is also the return of the iconic 6876 jacket initially designed almost ten years ago.

The 12th edition Capandula is made in England with taped seams, M.O.D facility, Aqua guard YKK zips, metal cord stops & ends. Made of 100% cotton high performance L24 Ventile® 2005 Gsm. Made in strictly limited numbers and released by 6876, Our Culture and Casual Connoisseur. 

The jacket has broad shape and low raglan sleeve which helps accommodate the large front stow pockets which also have front zip entry.

image

THIS IS FOR OLD AND NEW FRIENDS


The Men Who Walk Through Time, is a quote that we stole from Colin F. and changed from singular to plural. Why? Because we walk through time together. We’re in this for the comradery. This includes all our friends in Scandinavia, the UK, Italy, Germany and everywhere in between. It also includes you. Hanging out, hanging in – sticking by each other through the good times and the bad. Like glue. 

All dizzy and under the influence, a dear friend of ours held this speech during a late night out on the down. If only someone would have been sober enough to remember his exact words. We’ve tried but it’s impossible. Like a lion holding a speach for donkeys.

Anyway, here it is, our sense of belonging put into words and transformed onto a sweatshirt and t-shirt that we hope will make you satisfied. 

”I don’t need answers - about today. Don’t worry about the future - it won’t go away. I was there before, I’ll be there again. Looking out for you - until I’m dead.”

This friday, the 24th, we release them at 15.00 Swedish time and as usual these are limited so act. Available in sizes S/M/L/XL/XXL and you’ll get them from store.thisisourculture.com where you also will find size charts and all the info you might need. 

OUR CULTURE & MAMNICK POCKET KNIFE


Today we release our latest product, the Our Culture pocket knife, which is a collaboration with the great minds of Mamnick. 

This knife is limited and numbered to only 30 pieces and will be released at 17.00 Swedish time over at store.thisisourculture.com

Produced in Sheffield and made of 100% British, brushed and stainless steel , this two bladed knife comes with etched Our Culture mountain and a unique number. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS


image

HÖSTKVÄLLEN


Hur blekt är allt, hur härjadt, vissnadt, dödt! Hvar är den blomning nu, som sommarn födt? I dalen domnar allt, i skogen tiges, och till en graf den skumma jorden viges.

Dock, ögat lyftes sällt från grafven opp, en högre värld har grytt för hjärtats hopp, i jordens skymning klarna stjärnelanden, och oförgängligt ler ett hem mot anden.

Så drömmer jag i höstens kväll och ser, hur löfvet faller stelt från björken ner, en naken strand i vikens djup sig speglar och öfver månen silfvermolnet seglar.

THE NAESS No. II


Arne Næss (pronounced ‘Ness’) was born in Slemdal, near Oslo, Norway in 1912. He studied philosophy and became a professor of philosophy at the University of Oslo in 1939 just as Norway was about to get attacked during WW2. Despite the difficulties that the war brought, Arne stayed at the University and it wasnt til 1969 when he left the academy to pursue his environmental passions. Næss took part in a protest in 1970 against the building of a dam in a Norwegian fjord. During the protest he chained himself to the rocks of a waterfall and was removed by police, but succeeding in stopping the


Besides philosophy and eco activism, Næssountaineering and he took part in a number of significant expeditions. The love of mountains was influential in his work – the ‘T’ of ‘Ecosophy T’ stands for the Tvergastein mountain hut in the Hallingskarvet massif where he spent much of his time contemplating nature. 

He was knighted by the norwegian king, Harald in 2005 and made a commander with star of the Royal Norwegian order of St Olav First Class. He died in 2009 at the age of 96.
Arne was a fan of cool headwear (sometimes handmade in the outskirts of the norwegian countryside). We like honesty, and its probably the climbing and weird hats that attracted us to Næss in the first place – not his philosophy teachings. We are however supporters of anyone whos trying to make the world a better place. 

What about the hat then?

Its a reversible bucket hat designed by OC/CC and produced in very small quantity. Chambray on one side and Woodland camo on the other in order to please as many of you as possible. Comes with two special made buttons only available with this piece. 

Naess No. 2 comes in two sizes – Medium and large. Please visit http://store.thisisourculture.com for more info and measurements. 

RELEASED WEDNESDAY 6/11 20.00 SWEDISH TIME/7 PM UK TIME

230 NM NORTH


O’er the glad waters of the dark blue sea,

Our thoughts as boundless, and our souls as free,
Far as the breeze can bear, the billows foam,
Survey our empire, and behold our home!
 
- Lord Byron

It was the Saturday before my brief two week summer vacation was about to start and I had no idea how to spend my time off work.
Scrambling ideas from camping on my own to a trip abroad I met up with a friend for a swim in the mid summer heat. Out of nowhere he mentions that he’s going sailing for a week with a friend starting Monday and after a brief conversation we agreed I should tag along. We went home and started to plan the trip, and I couldn’t help but feel that it couldn’t have panned out any better. Our aim was to get as high up the Swedish cost as we could reach in a week where we would drop of the boat to my friends parents who would sail on.

Monday arrived and after the last preparations and shopping we set sail around noon. The boat, a 35 foot single mast, is the perfect size for three men with Carl as skipper and Jimmy and I acting as deck crew and was a delight to sail. The first days sailing was smooth with nice weather and an easy breeze, and a perfect start to get a feel for the boat and to build confidence of its handle and in ourselves as we knew rougher times would lie ahead. Evening was approaching to we set course towards a guest harbor for the evening. Thrilled to be off we enjoyed a meal and quite a few beers in the first of many beautiful sunsets.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Next morning started off in the same way, a nice steady tempo, and as we had reached the outskirts of Stockholm’s archipelago the scenery changed a bit, with more open water on our starboard side. Towards the evening after a couple of hours with the winds in our sails and strong sun we decided to drop anchor in a cove and spend the night. A nice custom has formed already with a glass of whisky as soon as anchor has been dropped this time accompanied with another magnificent sunset we suddenly hear a bit of noise from the woods nearby. Out jumps a couple of small deer destined to cross the water over to the other side. They barely take notice of us, but the sense of freedom that washes over me at that moment by their sheer presence is hard to top. Later on a huge badger would scurry along the shore line and that night I fell asleep in a blissful state.

image

image

image

image

image

Now it was time to leave the comfort of Ålands Hav and having Åland at our starboard side for some cover. We passed Öregrund and were now out on the Baltic Sea, albeit not smack in the middle of it, but it was more than a noticeable change. We were northbound with constant southern winds, and the swells had gained momentum and size. On previous days we had eaten prepared lunches, or perhaps settled with a sandwich, but this day we wanted to cook something extra and as Jimmy was chopping chili a large swell made him lose a bit of traction in his feet and ended up cutting a bit of his thumb and nail straight off. Perhaps a bit of overconfidence together with poor luck, but the first aid kit came rushing out to stop the bleeding.

As afternoon arrived the winds slowed down a bit and we were pleased to reach our destined rest stop in form of the island Eggegrund, just outside of Gävle. A small island that used to house a fishing community hundreds of years ago that now acts as a nature reserve. We attached to a buoy just outside and took our rubber dinghy to shore, going in turns with groceries and bodies to have a barbecue on the stony beach. Just as the sun had set a rainstorm swept in quicker than we were able to react, which meant we had to rush back to pack everything on the dinghy at once and row out to our boat, a few kilos more and I’m sure the dinghy would have sunk.

image

image

image

image

image

Strengthened by our first encounter with open sea we pushed the boat harder during the following day as we set sail for an island we had spotted out on our map the evening before. It looked like a nice place to stay a couple of days as we were aching to do some fishing. The winds were strong and with quite a heel we forced our way north making good speed. As we approached the island and were headed in to the hidden cove with a extremely narrow passage in, and we were not far from hitting a rock on the way in, as well as the way out.

We had yet another barbecue as the night fell, and we stayed up late as we knew the next day was free of sailing. We spent the most of the day after rummaging around the island, fishing without catching a single bite, and preparing the evenings meal. It was nice with a break, but the urge to get out on the waters again was overpowering my sense to relax completely.

image

image

image

The next day was straight sailing with southeastern wind once again trying to push us away from shore and with us doing what we could to fight back and stay on course to at least keep a visual on the coast line as we passed a seal reservoir along the way. Today our destination was Agön, a large nature reserve that had suffered substantially from a forrest fire some 20 years ago and boasts an old fishing community with a fisherman’s chapel first built 1660 and mediaeval remnants.

Today the fishing community consists of summer dwellers in contrast to the year round living it used to be, but nothing could have prepared me for how idyllic the place was. Instantly my whole entity felt the urge to sell everything I own and move into one of the small lodges in the village. We had a nice chat with some of the locals before we continued our trek through the forrest to the light house on the far end of the island.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

We were reaching the end of our trip and we felt the urge to push on. As it was set up we could have stopped anywhere on the way, but with Sundsvall in our reach we wanted to seize the opportunity. As we set out we faced a stronger wind than ever before but our confidence rode high, and we pushed on north. The swells were mighty and caused quite a bit of water to splash onto deck so the waterproof gear came out. For our last night we had chosen Mellanfjärden as our destination. A guest harbour between Hudiksvall and Sundsvall. Just after berth at Mellanfjärden we spoke to some of the people in the harbor, and apparently only one boat had left the harbor that morning, as the wind had been to strong for most. I suppose our naiveté urged us on and delivered an adventurous day to say the least, but in retrospect things could surely have gone awry.
As it was the last night, we had a nice meal in the restaurant in the harbor and a few local beers to top it of. The morning after we set out early to reach Sundsvall as soon as possible.

Over 230 Nautical Miles later with a blown off windex from the second day and quite the adventure we reached Sundsvall around 5 in the afternoon. As we handed over the boat I realised I could have continued on a lot longer, and I couldn’t shake the feeling that I was giving away my home..

image

image

image

The Game of Adelsö


image

Weather wise, the Swedish summer is still far from over, but at the Our Culture Camp, most of us are now returning to work after a long and very hot semester. This became one of those summers where we all remained “here” instead of vagabond trips to other parts of the world. Maybe thats an age thing? You get to the point where you’re too stubborn and tired to jump on a plane soon as summer arrives. It could also have to do with the fact that few places can match a sunny Scandinavia when the North truly delivers. It makes much more sense to flee the country when its cold, wet and pitch black.

So, we decided to embark on a day trip and catch as much as possible in one day, without dying of a cardiac arrest caused by the heat. We wanted water, history, proper forests and meadows, all packaged in “one walk” and therefore settled for Adelsö, an island 45-55 min outside of Stockholm… but with zero “city infrastructure” in sight. 

From Wikipedia:

"The history of Adelsö began with the Stone Age. Adelsö at that time consisted of small islands which emerged from the sea at the end of the Ice Age. Mälaren, a freshwater lake, did not yet exist, so the skerries that were to become Adelsö lay beneath the Baltic Sea.  Fishing, bird- and seal-hunting created the foundation for the life of the people living there. Graves from the early and late Stone Age exist, but most of the grave sites date from the Iron Age, mostly the Viking Age.

image

There are also two ancient hillforts (fornborgar) on Adelsö; one of them, situated on Skansberget near Stenby, is unusually well-preserved.  Adelsö, earlier called Alsnö or Alsnu reflects the importance of the area during the Viking Age. The King’s House (Kungsgården) was next to Hovgården and the monarch ruled over the nearby Viking city of Birka. 

This is also the site of Kungshögarna at Hovgården. Kungs means king or royal and högarna, from the Old Norse word haugr, means mound or barrow.  During the latter part of the 12th century, a Christian church was built next to Hovgården. Birger Jarl’s sons built Alsnö hus, a splendid castle where King Magnus I in 1279 assembled the Meeting of Alsnö. At that meeting, the Ordinance of Alsnö was established, introducing the privileges of the Swedish nobility.  During the Middle Ages, Alsnö hus was used as a summer palace for kings and governors but later fell into ruin. What remains of the castle and several graves near Hovgården was excavated during archeological digs conducted between 1916 and 1926.”

We arrived with the small ferry at noon, parked at the local “pub/pizzeria/take away” (think the exact opposite of a classic pub) – Adelsö Krog, and started our little adventure right away. 

The ramble/walk we chose was comfy and sweet – 1.7 km with a cool mix of exactly everything we wanted. Just after a few km of deep dark woods we came up on a hill with about 20-25 graves from the early iron age. Even though, only small barrows covered in grass remain, you could still feel the presence of history and the folks that lived here a long long time ago.

image

image

image

A few kind souls had put a few tree benches up on the hill, so it was the perfect place for some rest, coffee or maybe even a couple of bottled beauties.

Our march continued, down a farmers valley and then back into a new big black forest. Left right, left right, left right… and the Our Culture boys covered in flies. Yes flies. There were no mosquitos in sight, but fucking hundreds of flies… drawn to the fresh wax of a Barbour Tarras bag (its camouflage didn’t help).

image

image

image

Eventually the trail went upwards to the coolest look-out tower (in wood) I’ve ever seen. Simple but also a real beaut from a picky architectural point of view. It felt like the Twilight zone from the top of the tower. You could see miles and miles of forests and Mälaren (Swedens third biggest lake)… but not a suburb or part of Stockholm in sight. Its like the creators of this thing built it so that only nature could be seen – which was all good with us. 

image

image

image

The sight of water, made us long after just that so we made our way down to Mälaren as fast as we could for a swim and a snack. Couple of amateur sailor couples greeted us with snaps, beer and coffee from their boats. Cool folks in their 60s living life to the fullest and enjoying everything that Swedish summer can offer.

image

image

The water of Mälaren was warm and sweet. Flies were gone, and so was all the dirt and sweat from the woods after a couple of swims. We bathed, ate, drank water, bathed some more… and left after an hour or two, waving our new senior sailor friends good bye.

We had most of our hard walking behind us which was good since the heat (and weeks of beer and 100% relaxation) was taking its toll. 

The circlular route had turned us around, and we were once again walking through cool small forests with Mälaren on our right side. We had hoped for more wild life than bloody flies, and just as we thought that we were out of luck – a eagle hunting for rats appeared in the blue sky. It greeted us, and we returned the call – by making what we thought were “hello eagle sounds”. You can laugh all you want, but wouldn’t you do the same if the king of the skies flew over and said hello to you?

image

image

Some more walking back to Adelsö Krog and the late afternoon had arrived. We were glad and surprised to find out that the small establishment representing the island had their own beer. A bloomy golden thing, perfect for killing the thirst after a long day of summer rambling.

We have said this before, living where we live – it would be a sin not trying to experience as much as possible of nature – as often as possible. There was a time in our youth when we didn’t see the point in it, because we were too busy wasting time. I’m so glad “that time” is over. 

image

image

Forests, mountains, lakes and seas – here we come.

GLAD MIDSOMMAR


THE MANIFESTO


Manifesto tee out thursday the 6th at 10.00 Swedish time. It comes in two different colours and in really limited numbers so be sure to act fast if you want to wear this one during the summer. 

store.thisisourculture.com

6876 WAYS OF CREATIVITY


image


We’ve been following you and your work for many years now. You are always up to interesting projects – but before we look at the present, we’d like to go back a little in history – The student riots in Paris and the birth of punk – when, where and how was the name born? Did 6876 have anything to do with your interests at a young age – and what were your interests?

The name was born due to the fact that I wanted to reject the egocentric nature of “fashion” and had no intention of naming the brand after myself, Chris Houghton (who I started the brand with both ex Duffer) and i were in a pub and we liked the way the numbers on old London buildings looked and particular Old Street where we worked as in 159-162 etc so we thought that’s it numbers! Then I thought they had to mean something and had to be related to my/our interests as it shouldn’t just be about clothing but bring into play all interests.

So it became 68 = Paris, situationist, Weathermen etc. and 76 = Punk rock/Soweto riots etc. My interests we initially playing football for Sunday and school teams but later through my brother Bowie then most significantly punk and beyond.

The idea behind the name was to create a spirit of independence and non corporate mentality..i.e no advertising/no fashion shows etc rather than stylistic references to the years, initially people couldn’t recall the name/thought i was pretentious but i liked that it created a reaction, plus it would only be pretentious if i didn’t have a knowledge/experience of the references which I do…and that’s a very large part of my work in that it has to believable and authentic in its image/ideas.

image


6876 started in 1995 and have now been around for almost 20 years now. You studied graphic design (if we remember correctly) and then went on to design clothing. How did that come about?

I studied in Dundee graphics (not that successfully) then decided I needed to leave Scotland initially with the idea of textiles but switched to fashion which to be honest was out with my experience or everyones expectations. How much did you learn from your time at Duffer of St. George?

We guess it was a pretty busy time and really interesting era of the 1990s?

I came from a more art school background there i learnt business, retailing, intuitiveness and about London, New York and Europe…plus a certain irreverence It was a good time and an introduction to London in a very special way..formative years/experience etc.

Was 6876 ever a vision to create something more revolutionary? And if so… is that a ethos you follow today?

My main view was a wanted to work for myself,create my own aesthetic although I wasn’t really sure it would be understood or accepted. Basically to create a modern British brand rather than the twee heritage view of Britain that had its accent firmly on product/ideas rather than hype/pr and to make it affordable/accessible.

image


image


Its a bit out of the regular way that most other brands work to not release full collections and I know that question has been directed to you before but was is the ups and downs working the way you are and is it something that will ever change? As the business is today it actually seems like it has evolved more towards the way you’ve always worked. Getting clothes out there regardless of seasons and collections. A lot of designers and brands have to compete with the larger chains that push fast work rather than creativity. What are your thoughts on the business climate and how do you work to find margins and survive?

There’s been so many stages in 6876 and i see this period as part of the overall cycle,part necessity part choice but also ultimately I think a progressive way…I travel but not extensively and many directions/ideas come from a reaction to what i see around me..I’d prefer to take my own path rather than follow for better or worse rather than what everyone else is doing…influences are taken from the usual or to me the usual people,culture/music etc…as form the methods I think the way we are working now is good but we just need to take it a bit further and release more products.

The Sonora and Capandula are now considered classic jackets alongside with garments from much much older brands. How do you feel about that?

Those jackets were designed/drawn in a very naive pure way so its gratifying that they’ve become popular and its great that they have such a following from such a purist crowd. 

You were very early with collaborations – what’s difference between working together with legendary labels like Rohan and Fred Perry vs working ”alone”?

There’s a difference between collaborations i.e Rohan and Cash Ca as they are joint design/business ventures and Fred Perry which was mostly a consultancy. Collaborations can be very pleasurable as each partner brings different skills/resources although working with larger companies can mean things go slower…consultancy is interesting in terms of coverage/resources but can be very frustrating as larger companies are very conservative


image


The work you did together with Regent Belts was in our eyes some of the best stuff you’ve done. Amazing quality and design and we wear our Capandula bags every week. How’s the future looking for R6?

The R6 project was very enjoyable and educational for me but ultimately frustrating as the factory went into liquidation which was really sad… so no more R6 but we are developing a bag with Chapman which will be quite out of the norm for them at the moment, anyway I am really proud of the R6 styles.

How did the CashCa collaboration come about? And how do you look at the future of the collaboration?

Gary Aspden who has worked at and now consults for Adidas is a friend (and in fact did one of his early internships @ 6876) and started to bring Kazuki to the studio as he thought he’d find it interesting and after a few visits he started to look through our archive with a few to a collaboration. For 2014 i’ve asked if we create a few more styles in different categories and going forward I don’t want to plan too much as at the moment it seems like a natural process.


image

Whats a ordinary day like for you in 2013?

Some days I take my children to school then the studio others start work at home then down to my studio which is the place i really enjoy being as I’ve created what i think is a good atmosphere and we have other creatives sharing etc plus i love the building..then its the usual planning product and sometimes visits to the UK factories.

Punk exploded in 1976 – when was the last time you heard a ”new” punk band that had the ”thing”?

Not sure that’s something that will happen in such a dramatic way again but I thought the band Factory Floor had a great sound/attitude when i saw them.

A lot of your pieces are quite technical, made to stand in harsh environments and situations. Are you often outdoors? What has been your most inspiring encounter with nature?

I enjoy camping with my family and the best trip we made was a few years ago for two weeks in the Outer Hebrides in Scotland,its a remote but beautiful place with extreme contrasts in weather in fact these Islands and its culture/climate are pretty unique.


image


How does your design process work and where do you find inspiration in the daily life?


That’s a big question! as its a small company and there’s the business/logistical side to take care of as well its sometimes tricky to make time to design so I just try to surround myself which as much of my source books and reference garments as i can but in reality directions for 6876 tend to be my reactions to what i see around me and more specifically I almost react against the prevailing trend or just decide i want to move in a different direction its difficult to quantify.


Is footwear something you want to incorporate more, seeing as you did the collaboration with Trickers in early 2000?


Trickers was a place/time and even though i would like to incorporate more footwear if would have to link naturally to the type of clothing the brand was producing


You have listed Alden as some of your favorite footwear, is that a possible partner for future endeavors?


Alden I wear and love as a brand but sometimes i feel that as a designer you have to still maintain that feeling of being a consumer/fan so there’s certain products like Alden and premium denim that I think its best to leave like that plus I think stores like Union Made do a great job with Alden so to me it wouldn’t seem relevant to replicate that.

We are suckers for lists. Which movies are on your Top 5?


I will give ten and it could have been 20 and will be different next week….


image


Battle of Algiers - Gillo Pontecorvo 
Weekend - Jean Luc Godard 
IF - Lindsay Anderson 
The Conversation - Francis Ford Coppola 
2046 - Wong Kar Wei 
Blade Runner - Ridley Scott 
Out of the Blue - Dennis Hopper 
Deer Hunter - Michael Cimino 
Fitzcarraldo - Werner Herzog 

& recently 

A Prophet - Jacques Audiard 


image


You used Minor Threats font for one of your designs…even used an X:ed up hand. Was there a time in your life when you listened to old US hardcore/punk?

The whole history of punk and its ebb and flow from the US to the UK and the different ways it developed i think is very interesting. Also the hardcore scene was very interesting as they were mostly independent and the whole story of Dischord records within that scene as well as the music I found inspiring plus that linked to the british independent record label ethos which was a big influence on 6876. The reason we appropriated some of the imagery was at that time I was pretty irritated by “fashion” brands trying to aline themselves with what they saw as Rock star cool (there are still some designers doing this now) that I thought we would react against that by referencing straight edge i.e no drink, no meat or drugs just the music/community etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Band_Could_Be_Your_Life


image


6876 is to a lot of us both very British, but also a brand without borders – recommend anyones reading this a bar, place, hotel, beach somewhere in the world that you think highly of?

As this is a 6876 feature the nature reserve at the far north of Corsica is an amazing place that’s even quiet in the middle of summer some people might recognize the name Capandula.

Finally. This whole thing can sometimes feel like it lacks humor and fun. What’s the craziest experience you’ve had with 6876? A situation or event that afterwards made you cry of laughter…

… in the late 90’s my then production manager who was very experienced (ex Paul Smith) decided we should visit all the fabric mills we are working with in Italy as we were manufacturing there as well.

It was a really good time (which to be honest I don’t think i really appreciated at that moment) as we took trains, were driven by Paul Smith’s Italian office and then we decided to hire a car as we were now as we thought getting the hang of it.

Unfortunately on our first outing a large truck reversed into our car and we had to take it back to the hire company and explain with our limited language skills what had happened…

image

Photography by Kenneth McKenzie, Siripim & Our Culture, all rights reserved.

SOUTHERN CRAFTSMANSHIP FOR NORTHERN CONDITIONS


image


image


image


image


image


image


”It might look like a “simple” jacket but there is a lot of work in it”

The Nemen X Our Culture collaboration became everything we could have wanted and for those of you that don’t know, we just released a very limited jacket with Nemen (now sold out and sent out to different parts of the world).


Not only would we like to say hi and thanks to Fabio and our friends that purchased it – but we would also like to take the opportunity to bragg a little bit.  

The fabric is an ITS Artea collaboration with Nemen and processed at Tintoria Emiliana where Fabio went for a double dyeing process and a anti-drop treatment to make the jacket waterproof.

What makes it extra special for us northerners is the fact that it is 100% made in Italy. Growing up and looking through grandpas or your fathers closet, anything that was made in Italy or the UK, always meant ”keep away because this one is special”. Well this Nemen X Our Culture jacket is exactly THAT special to us, and we hope that each and everyone of you that were able to get your hands on it will feel the same. 

DETAILS

• Double garment dyed in collaboration with Tintoria Emiliana then treated with an anti-drop process to make the garment water resistant.

• The jackets is made using a special nylon fibre developed together with ITS Artea (outer) and cotton twill (inner).

• It features 4 roomy outer pockets closed via Cobra stud buttons and one inner pocket.

• Drawstrings at waist and on the wire hood to make sizing adjustable.

• Cuffs are also adjustable via Cobra press studs.

• Closed via Cobra press studs and Lampo zip.

• 100% Made in Italy – every bit of the jacket, including accessories like zip, buttons, labels, swing tags etc.

Return to the land of the Lombards


image

Once upon a time, The Svears crossed the Russian plain, continued south on Russian rivers to the Black Sea and then on to Constantinople (todays Istanbul). 

The norsemen traded and colonised around the Baltic, then sailed up Russia’s rivers and became the first rulers of the Kievan Russian state. They made their way to Constantinople and the Orient where some of them served as the bodyguards of the Byzantine emperors.
In west, laid the Land of the Lombards, to where these bearded gnomes continued on their journey for gold and glory. 

Today, there are three or four italian rune stones, Varangian rune stones from 11th-century Sweden that talk of warriors who died in Langbarðaland (Land of the Lombards) – the Old Norse name for Italy. On these rune stones it is southern Italy that is referred to as Langobardia – Land of the Lombards. 

Fast forward a couple of hundred years and these Lombards have become great friends of ours. As you might understand, there are limits to how much we can connect our designs to history or events. But, this design named ”Berg & Hav”, is inspired by vikings of the Iron age sailing down to Constantinople and the Mediterranean Sea . 

So maybe it should be named ”(From) Mountain to Sea”. 

We just spent a couple of days in Genoa with friends from the UK and Italy… but that has actually nothing to do with this t-shirt. Or maybe it has, because there is a Mediterranean restaurant in Genoa named Le Rune that we of course forgot about during our weekend in Lombardia. 

Old Norse transcription:
Guðlaug let ræisa stæina at Holma, sun sinn. Hann do a Langbarðalandi.

English translation:
"Guðlaug had the stones raised in memory of Holmi, her son. He died in Lombardy.

Our Culture translation:
”Purchase the Berg&Hav t-shirt and wear it this summer on your own escapades.”

__


The Berg & Hav Tee

Comes in three colours, black with white print, grey melange with black print and white with camo print.

Size M/L/XL/XXL. 

Limited numbers. 

Thursday 16th May 10.00 Swedish time.

store.thisisourculture.com